Natural Treatment for Rectal Prolapse

Used unqualified, the term rectal prolapse often is used synonymously with complete rectal prolapse (external rectal prolapse), where the rectal walls have prolapsed to a degree where they protrude out the anus and are visible outside the body. However, most researchers agree that there are 3 to 5 different types of rectal prolapse, depending on if the prolapsed section is visible externally, and if the full or only partial thickness of the rectal wall is involved.

Rectal prolapse may occur without any symptoms, but depending upon the nature of the prolapse there may be mucous discharge (mucus coming from the anus), rectal bleeding, degrees of fecal incontinence and obstructed defecation symptoms.

Rectal prolapse is generally more common in elderly women, although it may occur at any age and in both sexes. It is very rarely life-threatening, but the symptoms can be debilitating if left untreated. Most external prolapse cases can be treated successfully, often with a surgical procedure. Internal prolapses are traditionally harder to treat and surgery may not be suitable for many patients.

Treating the underlying causes of rectal prolapse usually cures the problem. In otherwise healthy elderly patients who have repeated rectal prolapse, surgery is sometimes used to repair physical problems that make prolapse more likely to occur.

However, the surgery can result in scar tissue and adhesions, which can narrow the rectal canal (anal stenosis) and interfere with the rectal and pelvic muscles relaxing during a bowel movement. These two problems can then cause difficulty having a bowel movement, or result in hemorrhoids or rectal or anal fissures (tears) from repeated straining.

To treat the underlying conditions that cause or perpetuate rectal prolapse, we need to address a number of possible factors:

1. Painful rectal area - Following prolapse, you may experience pain in the muscles surrounding the rectum; the levator ani muscles. If you feel your muscles from your sitz bones (the “sitting bones” you can feel at the bottom of your bum when you sit on a bicycle or hard seat), working up both sides of your buttocks and across just under your sacrum (the flat, slightly rounded pad of bone at the base of your spine) - you are feeling the levator ani muscles. There are a number of techniques you can use to reduce or eliminate pain in this area.

2. Straining to defecate or improper defecation position - The western practice of sitting on the toilet prevents the rectum from straightening out and opening – making us much more prone to constipation, hemorrhoids and fissures! Constipation can play a major role in rectal prolapse and ongoing aggravation. See my video above as this alone may work wonders for you!

3. Weakened, stretched or traumatized pelvic muscles - If you apply gentle counter-pressure to the muscles closest to the area where your rectum protrudes when you're having a bowel movement, you may be able to hold the rectum inside and avoid it coming out with the stool.

4. Bodywork therapy - The anorectal canal is girdled by muscles and ligaments, which the pudendal nerve runs through. Following surgery, childbirth, or any kind of trauma or continual strain, you can develop muscle, tendon or ligament strains in corresponding tissues or organs. This strain and weakening of the muscles and ligaments can lead to rectal prolapse. The other thing that will greatly help you to heal the underlying cause of your prolapse is bodywork therapy from a specifically trained practitioner.